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6 edition of Below-replacement fertility in industrial societies found in the catalog.

Below-replacement fertility in industrial societies

causes, consequences, policies

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  • 14 Currently reading

Published by Cambridge University Press in Cambridge [Cambridgeshire], New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Fertility, Human -- Congresses.

  • Edition Notes

    Other titlesPopulation and development review. Vol. 12 (Supplement)
    StatementKingsley Davis, Mikhail S. Bernstam, Rita Ricardo-Campbell, editors.
    ContributionsDavis, Kingsley, 1908-, Bernstam, Mikhail S., Ricardo-Campbell, Rita., Hoover Institution on War, Revolution, and Peace.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsHB901 .B45 1987b
    The Physical Object
    Paginationx, 360 p. :
    Number of Pages360
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL2377947M
    ISBN 100521343240
    LC Control Number87006371

    In the early s (blue line), below-replacement fertility was virtually unknown. By the late s (red line), there had been considerable change, with about a quarter of the world's population experiencing fertility below By (green line), the process of fertility decline had advanced still further, with the median now at Evolutionary Approach to Below Replacement Fertility HILLARDKAPLAN, TER,* CKER,2 ON3 1DepartmentofAnthropology,UniversityofNewMexico.

    In stage 5 (only some theorists acknowledge this stage—others recognize only four), fertility rates transition to either below-replacement or above-replacement. Key Terms demographic transition theory: Describes four stages of population growth, following patterns that connect birth and death rates with stages of industrial development. Description: Founded in , Population and Development Review seeks to advance knowledge of the interrelationships between population and socioeconomic development and provides a forum for discussion of related issues of public policy. Combining readability with scholarship, the journal draws on high-level social science expertise-in economics, anthropology, sociology, and political science.

      Abstract. It is inevitable that the demographic regime of low mortality-low fertility will lead to population aging. This phenomenon is a product of industrialization and economic growth, and may in turn, threaten economic growth. 1. Author(s): Davis,K; Bernstam,M S; Ricardo-Campbell,R Title(s): Below-replacement fertility in industrial societies: causes, consequences, policies/ K. Davis, M.S.


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Below-replacement fertility in industrial societies Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. Below-replacement fertility in industrial societies: causes, consequences, policies. [Kingsley Davis; Mikhail S Bernshtam; Rita Ricardo-Campbell; Hoover Institution on War, Revolution, and Peace.;]. Below-Replacement Fertility in Industrial Societies: Causes, Consequences, Policies available in Paperback.

and sociologists, combines systematic discussions of the demographic effects of below-replacement fertility with efforts to explain its social origins, to determine the likely societal consequences and to assess potential policy Price: $ Get this from a library.

Below-replacement fertility in industrial societies: causes, consequences, policies. [Kingsley Davis; Mikhail S Bernstam; Rita Ricardo-Campbell; Hoover Institution on War, Revolution, and Peace.;].

Book Review: Below-Replacement Fertility in Industrial Societies: edited by KINGSLEY DAVIS, MIKHAIL S. BERMSTAM and RITA RICARDO-CAMPBELLCambridge: Cambridge University Press.

pp £ H/BAuthor: Allan G. Hill. Buy Below-Replacement Fertility in Industrial Societies by Kingsley Davis, Mikhail S. Bernstam from Waterstones today. Click and Collect from your local Waterstones or get FREE UK delivery on orders over £Pages: Book Reviews: BELOW-REPLACEMENT FERTILITY IN INDUSTRIAL SOCIETIES — CAUSES, CONSEQUENCES, POLICIES.

A Supplement to Population and Development Review Vol 12 Kingsley Davis, Mikhail S. Bernstam & Rita Ricardo-Campbell (eds). Cambridge University Press, Cambridge A$ Hardback. Below-Replacement Fertility in Japan: Patterns, Factors, and Policy Implications Women''s Rising Employment and the Future of the Family in Industrial Societies.

Article. This book brings. Kingsley Davis (Aug – Febru ) was an internationally recognized American sociologist and was identified by the American Philosophical Society as one of the most outstanding social scientists of the twentieth century, and was a Hoover Institution senior research fellow.

Period fertility started to drop significantly below replacement in most Western European countries during the s and s, while most fertility surveys, value studies and opinion polls have. Michael S. Bernstam, a research fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University, is an economic demographer who studies the centrality of income redistribution for the taxonomy and evolution of economic systems, long-run economic growth, demographic transition, social revolutions, conflict, and other social changes.

The focus of his work in the past ten years has been on. According to the most recent UN estimates. almost half of the world’s population lives in countries with below replacement fertility (BRF), i.e. with a total fertility rate (TFR) below births per woman. Of these, one-quarter have TFRs close to the replacement level, i.e.

between and ; the other three-quarters have really low fertility, below births per woman. Is fertility relevant to evolutionary analyses conducted in modern industrial societies. This question has been the subject of a highly contentious debate, beginning in the late s and continuing to this day.

Researchers in both evolutionary and social sciences have argued that the measurement of fitness-related traits (e.g., fertility) offers little insight into evolutionary processes, on. Sub-replacement fertility is a total fertility rate (TFR) that (if sustained) leads to each new generation being less populous than the older, previous one in a given area.

In developed countries sub-replacement fertility is any rate below approximately children born per woman, but the threshold can be as high as in some developing countries because of higher mortality rates.

An emphasis is placed upon the transmuting of the industrial revolution and rising incomes into longer lives and smaller families. Finally, explanations are sought for below-replacement fertility in Europe and elsewhere. The book has a strong theoretical focus and is unique in addressing both mortality and fertility over the full span of human.

This volume focuses on the relationship between change in the family and change in the roles of women and men on contemporary industrial societies. Of central concern is whether change in gender roles has fuelled - or is merely historically coincident with - such changes in the family as rising divorce rates, increases in out-of-wedlock childbearing, declining marriage rates, and a growing.

Near-global fertility decline began in the s, and from the s an increasing number of European countries and some Asian ones achieved very low fertility (total fertility below ) with little likelihood of completed cohort fertility reaching replacement level.

Earlier theory aiming at explaining this phenomenon stressed the incompatibility between post-industrial society and behaviour.

K. Davis, M.S. Bernstam, R. Ricardo-Campbell (Eds.), Below-Replacement Fertility in Industrial Societies, Population Council, New York () Below-Replacement Fertility in Industrial Societies, Population Council, New York (), pp. Google Scholar. P.A.

SorokinSocial and Cultural Dynamics. American Book Company, New York ( Many countries are experiencing below-replacement fertility (fewer than children born to each woman). Why are some countries concerned about their low fertility.

In countries with below-replacement fertility, there are or will be fewer workers to support a growing number of elderly retirees and to maintain a productive economy.

Fertility rates in the s and early s were much higher, but by the mids fertility rates had begun to drop again. By the s, they had declined to low levels, first in Central Europe, especially Germany, and in East Asia, initially in Japan, followed by the four “Asian Tigers” of South Korea, Singapore, Hong Kong and Taiwan.

Replacement level fertility is the level of fertility of a woman when she reproduces exactly enough daughters to replace her in the next generation.

It is called NRR (Net reproduction rate) which considers only daughters i.e. a female child. TFR. Looking further into the future, below replacement fertility is expected in countries by the end of the century, with the global fertility rate falling below two births per woman (Figure 1).

It is certainly difficult to imagine rapid transitions to low fertility in today’s high-fertility countries, such .1.

Author(s): Preston,S H Title(s): The decline of fertility in non-European industrialized countries/ S.H. Preston. In: Below-replacement fertility in industrial societies: causes, consequences, policies, edited by Kingsley Davis, Mikhail S.

Bernstam, and Rita Ricardo-Campbell Country of Publication: United States Publisher: New York, New York, Population Council,   This situation can be contrasted with fertility rates and age structures in most other industrialized countries.

Below-replacement fertility in much of Europe and in a number of Asian countries has created “mushroom cloud” shaped age structures where the numbers of children are just fractions of the size of the parents’ generations.